Tuesday, 7 January 2014

'Irish Inheritance'- Glendalough, monastic remains in County Wicklow

After a short break over the holiday season, I’m featuring again some of the places that appear in my soon to be published new novel ‘Irish Inheritance’. Today we're visiting Glendalough in County Wicklow, which Jenna and Guy visited on their trip across from County Galway to the east coast of Ireland.

Image from Glendalough Visitor Guide
The monstery at Glendalough was founded by St. Kevin in the 7th century, and became an important monastic community until it was destroyed (by the English) at the end of the 14th century. The church remained as a place of worship and pilgrimage, and the buildings which survive probably date from about the 11th and 12th centuries.

The Round Tower, probably the most famous round tower in Ireland, is about 90 feet high, with an entrance about 10 feet from the base. Towers like this may have been built as bell towers, but also served as storehouses and sometimes as places of refuge.

The Cathedral is the largest and most imposing building at Glendalough and dates from the late 12th/early 13th century. This photo shows the square headed west doorway, and you can see the remains of the chancel arch, and the east window.

Nearby, St. Kevin’s Church has a steep stone roof, formed of overlapping stones and supported by semi-circular vault. The belfry, with four small windows, rises from the eastern end of the roof.

There are several other churches at Glendalough, and further up the valley with its two lakes, are the foundations of St. Kevin’s cell, which was about 10 feet in diameter, and probably had a bee-hive type of roof.

I'm sure that Guy, my hero, being American, would have been as impressed by these ruins as my Canadian friends were when I took them to Glendalough a few years ago!

11 comments:

  1. Paula, my hubby and I have been there and it is such a beautiful, special place. Thanks for the photos - a great reminder of our trip as well.

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  2. So glad you liked the photos, Karen. I have masses more! As you said, it really is a beautiful place, and so evocative of its past history.

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  3. Gosh I love Ireland. Would love to visit there. Beautiful photos.

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  4. Thanks, Ariana! I love Ireland, been there about a dozen times. More photos next week!

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  5. You always make me feel like I've been there! You know I love these blogs. Sorry I've been so bad at commenting...but I ALWAYS read.

    Slowing down here now. I'll do better, probably. :-)

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  6. I just saw a picture of this...Oh, how I would love to go to Ireland!
    I guess I shall have to be content to read stories...keep them coming!

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  7. Looks fantastic, Paula - I've been to many great places like this in Scotland but not in Ireland!

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  8. No problem, Jo! I know you like my posts about 'places' and I'm happy you read them :-)

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  9. Tonette, Ireland is one of my favourite places - so much history, and wonderful scenery too.

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  10. Rosemary, everywhere you go in Ireland you see medieval remains - and in many places, prehistoric remains too.

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  11. Fascinating, and beautiful photos!

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